Immersed in the Gospel » part one (Mark 6:45-52)

How should Christians look at a storm? How should Christians watch storms?

This text is telling us, “Not like anyone else.”

It’s typical for some one to say Christianity is essentially a way of behaving. It’s a way of loving people. Of course it’s that, but it’s so much more.

Christianity is a way of being, and therefore, Christianity is a way of seeing.

Gospel of Mark

Message title: Immersed in the Gospel » part one (Mark 6:45-52)
Nineteenth week in the Gospel of Mark
Scriptures: Mark 6:45-52
Preacher: Jeff Patterson
Date: 3/19/17

Listen or download:

Scripture reading:

Mark 6:45-52 (ESV):

Jesus Walks on the Water

45 Immediately he made his disciples get into the boat and go before him to the other side, to Bethsaida, while he dismissed the crowd. 46 And after he had taken leave of them, he went up on the mountain to pray. 47 And when evening came, the boat was out on the sea, and he was alone on the land. 48 And he saw that they were making headway painfully, for the wind was against them. And about the fourth watch of the night[a] he came to them, walking on the sea. He meant to pass by them, 49 but when they saw him walking on the sea they thought it was a ghost, and cried out, 50 for they all saw him and were terrified. But immediately he spoke to them and said, “Take heart; it is I. Do not be afraid.” 51 And he got into the boat with them, and the wind ceased. And they were utterly astounded, 52 for they did not understand about the loaves, but their hearts were hardened.

Footnotes:
  1. Mark 6:48 That is, between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m.

Considering the date, just after St. Patrick’s Day, we also remembered Patrick and his influence in spreading the Gospel of Christ. He is remembered best not in the legends and fables and not in the ways his holiday tends to be celebrated. Perhaps we remember him best by reflecting on the “St. Patrick’s Breastplate,” which has traditionally been attributed to him. The word breastplate is a translation of the Latin word lorica, a prayer, especially for protection. These prayers would be written out and at times placed on shields of soldiers and knights as they went out to battle. St. Patrick’s Lorica points beyond himself and his adventurous life. It points to Christ, the one he proclaimed to the people who had taken him captive:

Christ with me,
Christ before me,
Christ behind me,
Christ in me,
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ on my right,
Christ on my left,
Christ when I lie down,
Christ when I sit down,
Christ when I arise,
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.


Audio for this teaching may be played above, and is included in the RENEW Church podcastsubscribe in iTunes here, or access the church podcast feed directly here.

This year each of us is invited on an adventure to build an altar to God each new day, to look up and love our Creator first. What will be your plan to develop a new rhythm of seeking God each day? » Find some help here.

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